Activities for a Holy Lent

AT-HOME ACTIVITIES FOR A HOLY LENT

The season of Lent began as a practice  of the early Church, which observed the days of Jesus’s passion and resurrection with great devotion. Very soon Lent became part of the Christian year as a forty-day period (minus Sundays) of preparation before celebrating Easter, especially for those wishing to be baptized. The Church today marks the season by focusing on our mortality as God’s creatures through self-examination, repentance, prayer, fasting, and selfless giving. In essence, Lent is a time of "giving things up" balanced by "giving to" those in need as we recommit ourselves to the life Jesus has opened to us in his death and resurrection. 

Lent leads us to the cross and the darkness of Golgotha, it also leads us to a deeper dependency on God’s grace as people of faith. So really, Lent is the church’s springtime. In fact, that’s what the word “lent” means—spring. We might imagine an image of Lent as God mercifully melting away the winter of our sin and shame so that this new life of resurrection and joy can take root and grow. Living a holy Lent should immerse us deeply in the reading of Script

The season of Lent began as a practice of the early Church, which observed the days of Jesus’s passion and resurrection with great devotion. Very soon Lent became part of the Christian year as a forty-day period (minus Sundays) of preparation before celebrating Easter, especially for those wishing to be baptized. The Church today marks the season by focusing on our mortality as God’s creatures through self-examination, repentance, prayer, fasting, and selfless giving. In essence, Lent is a time of "giving things up" balanced by "giving to" those in need as we recommit ourselves to the life Jesus has opened to us in his death and resurrection. 

Lent leads us to the cross and the darkness of Golgotha, it also leads us to a deeper dependency on God’s grace as people of faith. So really, Lent is the church’s springtime. In fact, that’s what the word “lent” means—spring. We might imagine an image of Lent as God mercifully melting away the winter of our sin and shame so that this new life of resurrection and joy can take root and grow. Living a holy Lent should immerse us deeply in the reading of Scripture, self-reflection, and prayer that focus us on the heart of God. 

If we dare to take the season seriously, we’ll find on the other side that our sacrifices and struggles—both for others and ourselves—have made us stronger disciples of Jesus.


Activities for Each Week of Lent

1. Clay

2. Oil

3. Water

4. Salt & Light

5. Forgiveness

 

Download this information as a pdf here

 

Last Published: February 12, 2021 9:46 AM
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